Mature Market Experts Gem of The Day: Will the average human will soon live to be 150+ years old?

Mature Market Experts: more mature market news and stats more often – Will we soon live forever? – By now, you probably have heard of researcher Aubrey de Grey. Some call Mr. de Grey a huckster, others call him a visionary. Regardless of what you call him, he is certainly thought provoking. In this TED video he argues that aging is merely a disease — and a curable one at that. Humans age in seven basic ways, he says, all of which can be averted.

Advertisements

Mature Market Experts Stat of The Day: Electronic Tracking and Care Coordination Tools Save Lives

Electronic tracking combined with patient centered-care management can reduce hospitalizations and deaths.

Electronic tracking combined with patient centered-care management can reduce hospitalizations and deaths.

Mature Market Experts: more mature market news and stats more often – Electronic Tracking and Care Coordination Tools Save Lives – As I have often posted before, I think technology is key to bridging the shortage of healthcare workers needed to care for the world’s booming senior population. Recent research is beginning to show the difference it can make. According to an article by Saher Selod of Mather Lifeways’ Aging In Action, “Researchers at the Oregon Health & Science University conducted an evaluation of the Care Management Plus (CMP) program. The results of the study indicate that the CMP program, an intervention tool that combines electronic tracking with patient centered-care management, reduced the number of deaths and hospitalizations for older adults suffering from several chronic illnesses.

The study was conducted in Seven Intermountain clinics where 1,144 patients received the CMP and 2,288 patients, in the control group, did not. According to the results, 6.5% of the CMP patients died in the first year compared to 9.2% from the control group. In the second year, 13.1% of CMP patients died in the second year compared to 16.6% in the control group. The difference in hospitalization rates was not as high as the death rates, except for those patients who suffered from diabetes.The researchers argued that this computerized care management system worked in conjunction with extra training for nurses to improve the health care outcomes for older adults.

CMP uses data regarding the patients’ condition that is logged into a care management tracking database. This tool is then used by the care plan teams of chronically ill older adults to access patient information quickly and address patient medical needs efficiently.

This new system would require the restructuring of primary care for those who are chronically ill. Researchers from the study recommend this restructuring in order to improve the quality of care for chronically ill patients in the long term.”

Additional source: Door, David, Wilcox, A., Brunker, C., Burdon, R. Donnelly, S. 2008. The effect of technology-supported multi-disease care management on the mortality of hospitalization of seniors. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 56(12): 2203-2210.

I also recommend reading The John A Hartford Foundation’s annual report.

Mature Market Experts Gem of The Day: Serving Aging Populations with Remote Monitoring Technologies

42-17073549 telehealth mature market experts

Mature Market Experts: more mature market news and stats more often – Serving Aging Populations with Remote Monitoring Technologies – Estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau expect the population of Americans aged 65 and older to increase by more than a factor of two between 2010 and 2050 [1]. At the same time estimates of healthcare expenditure increases between 2007 and 2017 show an increase to nearly 20% of GDP in this period [2]. These estimates were made prior to the recent financial crisis that began during the Fall of 2008. Further compounding this increasing demand and the concomitant increase in costs is the availability of allied healthcare professionals. Some studies [3] identify the likely decrease in the number of physicians entering any number of key specialty areas, including cardiology (20% decrease by 2020), geriatrics (35% of current demand met today), rheumatology (38 day average wait for a new appointment), and primary care (on the verge of collapse). Those of us who are baby boomers are on the leading edge of this demand and, in order to mitigate and minimize the cost impacts on our children, it is our challenge and responsibility to innovate and meet these challenges without passing along unnecessary burdens to our children and grandchildren.

For most of us, aging means more frequent and severe afflictions. Taking care of our health by improving diet, exercising, and maintaining an otherwise active lifestyle is essential to ensure a high quality life. Even with increased vigilance chronic ailments can affect us later in life, brought on both by our genetics and consequentially due to the lifestyles we’ve led in our youths. Ailments such as dementia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer’s, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, macular degeneration, osteoporosis, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and others take their toll. Managing chronic diseases is costly from a logistical perspective in terms of time and money. However, even more to the point, effective and quality oversight of patients with chronic ailments requires regular review, screening, and monitoring of patients. This is further complicated by the need to serve patients who lack the means or are physically incapable of leaving their homes for extended periods. Telehealth and remote monitoring are a means by which a case manager—an individual assigned to oversee the care of chronically ill patients within a home-health setting—can review patient information on a regular basis (for example, daily) and support both the patient and the primary care provider. Furthermore, Intensive care units and emergency departments are becoming more crowded. Individuals with insurance are going to EDs because they cannot find satisfaction in terms of prompt scheduling with their gatekeepers (family practitioners). The quantity of individuals with chronic ailments is on the rise (stroke, CHF, diabetes, COPD, etc.) This is in part due to the fact that people are living longer. At the same time the Medicare and SS systems will not be able to sustain the growth in population over age 65. This means that working individuals will increasingly bear the financial burden for us “boomers.” As a result of increased longevity and the fiscal challenges, the retirement age will increase.

So, what do we do? Well, several things: first, technology in the form of remote data collection, reporting devices and software will become more prevalent: glucometers, BP cuffs, spirometers and associated software will be more readily available for direct communication with personalized electronic health records. If the purpose of a typical visit is to take BP and diabetic assessments, this can be handled most by collecting data at the point of care (home) and transmitting to the physician’s office for assessment. Such also applies to nursing and assisted living facilities. Next, the technical infrastructure required to transmit and store these data will be required. Paying for this infrastructure could come from a number of sources. One possibility: most everyone nowadays has access to cable television. Cable companies could offer devices that integrate with existing modems to collect and transmit data to the FP, together with complementary emails to next of kin (e.g. “Your mother’s BP as of 8:10 this morning was 145/89”). Other technologies that can be used to evaluate and monitor chronic ailments such as macular degeneration can further reduce costs by providing video cameras at point of care whereby ophthalmologists can review retinal changes without requiring an elderly individual to be transported at expense and time to a hospital or office. In addition, support for remote consults via VoIP and video can be supported over the same network. This empowers the remote provider with the ability to interact with the patient All of these technologies are in use in remote pockets around the world today. But, they will become more prevalent. These technology implementations will reduce costs and provide for more personalized care in comfortable settings (homes). Of course, nothing takes the place of the tactile hands-on. But, for routine visits the above will be invaluable. In terms of the software technologies, personalized medicine will become the norm (eventually). Telehealth will be key. But, also, support for automated workflow in the acute care environment will need to be augmented. This means fully integrating all data into the enterprise HIS.

 The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through its Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology published operational scenarios focused on providing key information to assist in harmonizing standards on the implementation, certification, and policy implications for robust remote patient monitoring [4]. Included in this assessment are requirements on interacting with personalized health records and enterprise health information systems. The approaches to advancing remote monitoring include both seamless communication from medical devices at the point of care (i.e., in a patient’s home setting) and with a case manager and primary care provider both through electronic transfer, storage, and display of health information and remote video and audio interaction with patients in the same home health setting.

 Technology is not the silver bullet, but those described above are key enablers for remote health monitoring. Of course, the use of technology carries with it the implication that sufficient underlying infrastructure exists. This is not always the case in remote areas of the country. Satellite, cable, and fiber optic technologies are fairly extensive within the continental United States, but pockets and regions exist in which this is not the case. Therefore, a combined effort to extend the communications infrastructure must continue together with a unified effort to standardize and train and “in-service” individual care providers on these technologies must occur. One of the best mechanisms for enabling this is through the local hospitals and their satellite clinics.

[1] Source: Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau, August 14th, 2008; Table 12: “Projections of the population by Age and Sex for the United States: 2010 to 2050 (NP2008-T12)”

[2] Cinda Becker, “Slow: Budget Danger Ahead,” Modern Healthcare, March 3rd 2008.

[3] “Recent Studies and Reports on Physician Shortages in the U.S.,” Center for Workforce Studies, Association of American Medical Colleges, August 2007.

[4] “Remote Monitoring Detailed Use Case,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, March 21st, 2008.

So, how long do we have? Well, the sooner the better. Successful telehealth and remote monitoring programs exist throughout the United States and worldwide today. We should ensure that our elected representatives direct healthcare expenditures towards several specific areas to promote growth and alignment to meet the objectives of remote monitoring. These include continuing alignment on electronic personalized health records, expansion of our underlying communications infrastructure, and promoting common standards of communication among these records so that, regardless of location, a patient can communicate his or her information to any physician and allied health professional within the country. In summary: common storage, homogeneous communication, standardized formats.

 
 
 
 

 

Hot Trends In Marketing To The Boomer and Mature Consumer

CB104866 mature market shopping
I’ll (Tom Mann of TR Mann Consulting) be there will you? I’m scheduled to speak at this upcoming event “Hot Trends In Marketing To The Boomer and Mature Consumer” being sponsored by The International Mature Marketing Network and The MRGA Market Research Global Alliance. The event is being held May 15th in DC. Best of all, I’ve arranged for Mature Market Expert (MME) members to get a special rate of just $425 if you register before March 30th (if you’re not already a member, just join up through LinkedIn . . . it’s FREE to join MME). Also, you should know that there are only 125 seats available for this exclusive event. Here’s the list of confirmed speakers:
Kevin Lavery
Executive Creative Director of MillenniumDirect, the leading resource of marketing and research services in the United Kingdom for the 50+ population and President of the International Mature Marketing Network. Kevin will be the events’ lead-off speaker.
Andrew Nibley
Chairman and CEO of Marsteller, the advertising interactive, event management and production unit of Burson Marsteller, the world’s leading public relations agency, Andy has been a President, CEO or Chairman in four different industries – news, internet, music and advertising.
Sandra Timmermann
Assistant Vice President, MetLife, and Executive Director, MetLife Mature Market Institute. In her role, Sandy is responsible for research, education and consultation on aging and the 50+ market for MetLife and its business partners.
Dr. Carol Orsborn
Senior Strategist with Vibrant Nation.com, an information sharing website for leading edge Boomer women. Carol has provided counsel to over 100 leading companies in a broad array of industries including AT&T, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Prudential, The Walt Disney Company, Hallmark and Visa.
Laurel Kennedy
Founder of the “thinking firm” (part think tank and part consulting) called Age Lessons. She has appeared on national television including CNBC and Comcast TV, and as a keynote speaker before numerous industry and corporate forums. She has consulted for such clients as Johnson Wax, Keebler, Kraft, Kellogg, Quaker Oats, Pepsi and Sara Lee.
Todd Harff
President of Creating Results, a strategic marketing, public relations and advertising agency that drives demand for lifestyle-oriented products and services. Mr. Harff is a nationally renowned expert in understanding and motivating mature consumers. Over the has 15 years, Creating Results has helped government agencies, not-for-profits, Fortune 500 companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries build relationships with boomers and beyond.
Jacob Brown
President of In-Depth Research, a strategic market research company specializing in Boomer/Senior Research, Healthcare Research and Technology Research. In-Depth conducts research for many leading companies, including Microsoft, Tivo, United Healthcare, Intel, Varian Medical Systems, Adobe and Disney.
Gerald Linda
President of Gerald Linda & Associates, a 15-year-old marketing consulting firm. The firm provides marketing strategy, planning and research services to a wide mix of large, sophisticated marketers as well as smaller entrepreneurial companies. A second service is adding advertising and public relation agencies with their new business and account planning efforts. His responsibilities have included providing marketing counsel and research needs for such clients as Miller Brewing Company, S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. and BP Amoco.
Tom Mann
Managing partner of TR Mann Consulting, Tom is a recognized leader in the senior industry.  Previous to starting his own firm, Mr. Mann was the Senior Vice President of Advertising for Erickson Retirement Communities. In addition, he was the publisher of the Erickson Tribune, the nation’s largest monthly newspaper addressing health, active lifestyles for people 62 plus. His firm TR Mann Consulting specializes in advertising, marketing, communications and PR for Baby Boomers and beyond. Their clients include real estate developers, magazine publishers, the travel industry, and companies that sell consumer goods or services to the senior marketplace. Mr. Mann is also the founder of the Mature Market Experts Group.
Let me know if you plan on attending, I’d love to meet you.
Warmest regards,
Tom
Tom Mann, Managing Partner
TR Mann Consulting
Co-founder, Mature Market Experts

Mature Market Experts Stat of the Day: Europe’s Aging Population

eu-flag mature market experts

Mature Market Experts: more mature market news and stats more often – Europe’s Aging Population –Enhanced life expectancy and falling birth rates have meant that the European population is getting older. In 2005, just 16.5 per cent of the population of the 27 EU member countries was over 65, but that is set to rise to 18 per cent by 2010, according to the EU’s Eurostat data agency. The agency believes that this could rise to around 30 per cent by 2050, which has the potential to transform the lives of Europeans. Presently, 20 per cent of the German and Italian populations are over 65, making these nations the ‘oldest’ countries in Europe. This trend has occurred alongside falling fertility rates, notably in the countries from the former communist bloc, where rates have fallen by almost half in some nations.”

Source: Millenium

Source: Millenium

Bridging the Generations

42-15618459

It has always fascinated me how children in schools are taught history, but have never really met face-to-face with those who experienced or contributed to it. Much of the older generation (80+) has not been exposed to modern technology, such as computers, cell phones or  iPods. They remember the old Victrola, entertainment through radio, the milkman delivering products, and the terrible depression we’ve only heard about on the news.

I thought it would be a great idea to somehow bring the two generations together.

The seniors would learn about life, the way it is for the children of today. And the children would learn about what life was like when the seniors were growing up 80-100 years ago.

About four years ago, I started the Bridging the Generations program with the local schools in my city. I’ve worked with several teachers on an ongoing basis over the years to bring the two generations together.

The children came to Oak Park to “Meet and Greet” my residents for the first visit. They were paired up with the residents, and prepared to ask questions and listen to the wonderful stories the residents had to tell. They children were amazed! “Wow, you rode in a horse and buggy to school? “, one child asked.

They kids began to look at the residents as individuals. Often times, children are afraid of seniors and view them as old, frail and vulnerable. This program really brings them inside the lives of seniors. They begin to see that aging is something to look forward to, not something to be afraid of.  It is a part of life that we all experience. It’s what you make of it that counts.

The next visit I have with the children is when I bring my residents into their high school. The children cook and serve breakfast to my residents. Last year, East Ridge High School students cooked a huge Thanksgiving dinner for the residents. The student band came in and played for them.  And the drama club, which consisted of the students that are in our program, performed a musical for them. The residents spent time listening to the students read speeches on what they were thankful for, and the students listened intently to what the seniors were thankful for.

The seniors saw first hand the art of text messaging, clothing that wasn’t tailored and multiple piercings. At first, I think they were shocked as to why a mother would let their children go out looking like that!

As the students sat down with my residents, the residents began to look past their outer appearance. They began to have a deep appreciation for the students and understood it was a struggle for independence. The residents gave the kids advice about the importance of education, following their dreams and to not judge a book by its cover. High school kids usually don’t listen to adults.  But for some reason, the children listened to the seniors.

The students learned firsthand about segregation.  They learned it both from seniors who had to be at the back of the bus, and from the ones that could only play with friends who were white. The students were amazed that segregation was really a part of history. It was a very moving experience for both generations.

The relationship between the residents and the students is continuing to grow. We are involved with them once a week and many other times during the month.  New schools continually want to be a part of this program. The kids also come and visit my residents all the time outside of school. They bake for them, pen-pal with them and come to all of our dances.

The hugs and kisses are never ending.

My residents’ faces light up when they see the kids. And the kids cannot run fast enough through the door to hug and kiss my residents. This program will continue for years to come for a simple reason: as much as the kids brighten the residents’ days, the residents have enriched the lives of the children in the very same way. It is very important for children to step back in time and learn about life before the comforts of today. We want to teach them to not be afraid of growing old but to appreciate the lessons they’ve learned.  We want them to understand that life as we know it now was pioneered by those who lived before us.

It is our responsibility to teach children to respect and appreciate the elderly, and I will continue to do my part to bring the generations together.

About the Author: Terri Glimcher is a Contributing Writer at Inside Assisted Living and the Activity Director for Summerville at Oak Park Assisted Living, an Emeritus Senior Living property in Clermont, Florida.

What To Do In A Bad Economy: Stop Marketing!

catnhat2

My fellow Mature Market Experts, I thought I’d share a great take on the economy and marketing’s relationship by Charles Osgood (just click here). If you love Dr. Seuss, you’ll love this!

By all means, it you want to guarantee that you have no chance at success, stop or cut back your marketing and advertising efforts.

If, however, you are interested in gaining sales and market share in the boomer or senior market space, I recommend you contact some mature marketing experts (preferably my team at TR Mann Consulting).

PS  I’ll be speaking at and attending the International Council on Active Aging’s upcoming Conference (December 4th thru 6th) at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas. Let me know if you’re attending, so that we can try to catch up.