Mature Market Experts Stat of The Day: Nanotechnology in Medical Diagnosis and Treatment

j0438738 mature market cancer

Mature Market Experts: more mature market news and stats more often – Nanotechnology in Medical Diagnosis and Treatment- The average size of the avian influenza virus is on the order of 100 nanometers, or 0.1 microns. That a virus so small can wreak such havoc on the human body is a testament to the complex mechanisms associated with these infections. The ability to ward off such infections is also a testament to the awesome nature of the human immune system. By comparison, the width of a typical human hair is on the order of 100,000 nanometers (estimates put the range at 50,000 – 150,000, depending on the specific type of hair).

Now, consider the field of nanotechnology which focuses on the manufacture and fielding of mechanical and electronic devices of microscopic size, typically on the order of 100 nanometers or smaller. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides a fairly detailed overview of the use of nanotechnology in cancer treatment, and the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is an initiative that provides a focal point for public and private investigation for the application of nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer. Researchers and companies have been investigating the manufacture of devices of this order of magnitude and smaller for application in the treatment of disease. A major focus for nanotechnology in healthcare is, not surprisingly, the treatment of cancer. Specific methods and modes of delivery vary. Examples include outfitting little “robots” with markers that will burrow into and attach themselves to cancerous cells for the purpose of enabling treatment and destruction of malignant cells. A major benefit of this approach versus traditional methods of radiation and chemotherapy is that the malignancies can be targeted directly without attacking or otherwise molesting healthy cells. This is a major advancement, since many of the current therapies that attack cells indiscriminately will kill both healthy as well as malignant cell material. When battling this terrible disease the last thing needed is to destroy those healthy cells upon which the individual depends for sustenance and survival. Thus, nanotechnology provides a mechanism for delivering targeted, customized, tailored therapy.

 While we are on the cutting edge of the application of these technologies, the vision is real, and it is extremely promising. Treatment is only one aspect of nanotechnology use. Diagnosis is another area, in which nanoparticles can be used to assist in imaging of potential malignancies.

 While almost a cliché, the aging of the baby-boomer population will drive a number of these new technologies, applications, and initiatives. It is almost a tautology that early diagnosis of disease translates into a higher likelihood of survival. Technologies that support early diagnosis are, therefore, of great value and will enable better, more efficient, and more accurate treatment of disease going forward. As a member of this generation (albeit, at the tail end), I am very encouraged and supportive of this research. I recall some 17 years ago when my mother passed away from breast cancer that the use of exotic technologies such as nanotechnology was barely an inkling. Indeed, the three oft-used mechanisms for treating cancer have remained surgery, irradiation, or poisoning (chemotherapy). It has only been within the past 10 years or so in which alternative therapies have been devised and discovered that are not simply variants of these three. Research into the targeted treatment of cancer by destroying the genetic material within malignant cells so that they cannot reproduce or cannot receive nourishment is an astonishing advancement and offers great future promise—a testament to human ingenuity, talent, innovation, and creativity. As in vitro and in vivo medicine evolve, such future-looking technologies will be essential in terms of early diagnoses and intervention.

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